Arrow-Heads of the British Isles / Mesolithic / Neolithic / Bronze Age Arrows

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Arrow-Heads of the British Isles / Mesolithic / Neolithic / Bronze Age Arrows

Arrow-Heads of the British Isles / Mesolithic / Neolithic / Bronze Age Arrows

This following video showcases examples of British Arrow-Heads from the Mesolithic, Neolithic and Bronze Aged Periods. The primary examples are from collections held with the British Museum in London plus examples from other Museums across the British Isles including Scotland and Wales. The European Arrow-head industry was very different from what you might find in North Africa or North America, as both of those industries lasted far longer and in comparison they both outshine the European industry in craftsmanship. Very often a European Arrow-head can be crude, basic but by all means functional. Other times they are incredible, especially those Arrows made in the late Neolithic and Bronze Aged periods. So please keep an open mind whilst viewing the video, as some of the arrow-heads you will see might take you by surprise. At the end of this video, I will be showcasing British Arrow-heads from my own private collection all found on just one site in Essex, England and I will close the video with a couple of arrow-head finds too, so keep watching and we hope you enjoy the video. The Neolithic era saw sweeping changes across Britain as the country changed from small numbers of Mesolithic nomadic hunter gatherers to communities of farmers. These social changes saw technological changes as the tools for harvesting food and keeping farms became more abundant. No longer did everyone’s livelihood depend on having hunting skills and being able to manufacture arrow-heads. Instead specialist Knappers would have become but one of many highly skilled tradesman in a village selling services. Not necessarily in a village either, as some tools were known to have been imported from other areas of the British Isles and continental Europe too. With the seasonal nature of a pastoral lifestyle other concerns became important: art, rituals and status. So Highly skilled knappers were now called upon to manufacture objects of great craftsmanship and value. The crude arrowheads of the Mesolithic and early Neolithic gave way and were replaced by the elaborate ones of the late neolithic and Bronze Age. There are at least eleven different Arrowheads found across the British Isles – All recognised as such by museums across the country including the British Museum in London which holds probably one of the largest collections in the country. This collection of Eleven include Microliths from the Mesolithic, Flakes from the Neolithic to the more elaborate examples showcased shortly – So keep watching.

  • Published: 25 June 2021
  • Location: Essex, England
  • Duration: 16:54
  • Photography – Stephen Robert Kuta / Yhana Kuta
  • Written by – Stephen Robert Kuta

Music –

Music Licensed by Epidemic Sound

Arrow-Heads of the British Isles / Mesolithic / Neolithic / Bronze Age Arrows

This following video showcases examples of British Arrow-Heads from the Mesolithic, Neolithic and Bronze Aged Periods. The primary examples are from collections held with the British Museum in London plus examples from other Museums across the British Isles including Scotland and Wales. The European Arrow-head industry was very different from what you might find in North Africa or North America, as both of those industries lasted far longer and in comparison they both outshine the European industry in craftsmanship. Very often a European Arrow-head can be crude, basic but by all means functional. Other times they are incredible, especially those Arrows made in the late Neolithic and Bronze Aged periods. So please keep an open mind whilst viewing the video, as some of the arrow-heads you will see might take you by surprise. At the end of this video, I will be showcasing British Arrow-heads from my own private collection all found on just one site in Essex, England and I will close the video with a couple of arrow-head finds too, so keep watching and we hope you enjoy the video. The Neolithic era saw sweeping changes across Britain as the country changed from small numbers of Mesolithic nomadic hunter gatherers to communities of farmers. These social changes saw technological changes as the tools for harvesting food and keeping farms became more abundant. No longer did everyone’s livelihood depend on having hunting skills and being able to manufacture arrow-heads. Instead specialist Knappers would have become but one of many highly skilled tradesman in a village selling services. Not necessarily in a village either, as some tools were known to have been imported from other areas of the British Isles and continental Europe too. With the seasonal nature of a pastoral lifestyle other concerns became important: art, rituals and status. So Highly skilled knappers were now called upon to manufacture objects of great craftsmanship and value. The crude arrowheads of the Mesolithic and early Neolithic gave way and were replaced by the elaborate ones of the late neolithic and Bronze Age. There are at least eleven different Arrow-heads found across the British Isles – All recognised as such by museums across the country including the British Museum in London which holds probably one of the largest collections in the country. This collection of Eleven include Microliths from the Mesolithic, Flakes from the Neolithic to the more elaborate examples showcased shortly – So keep watching.


Stephen and Yhana - History and Adventure Hunters Almanac - OUT NOW
Stephen and Yhana – History and Adventure Hunters Almanac – OUT NOW
Stephen and Yhana - History and Adventure Hunters Almanac - OUT NOW
Stephen and Yhana – History and Adventure Hunters Almanac – OUT NOW

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